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Microsoft working on its own Tegra-powered superphone? Doubtful.

The popular rumor floating around at the moment is that Microsoft intends to announce self-branded handsets powered by NVIDIA’s beefy Tegra architecture for next-gen phones and MIDs at the GSMA’s Mobile World Congress in February of next year. Let’s put aside for a moment the fact that Redmond continues to vehemently deny having any interest in getting into the hardware end of its Windows Mobile racket — concealing the truth is a part of doing competitive business, after all — and turn our attention to the practical matter of whether this makes any sense whatsoever. First off, Windows Mobile’s strength lies in its incredibly deep and wide partner base, a base that includes visionary teams at HTC, Samsung, LG, Motorola, and countless others. With Android and Symbian finally becoming viable opportunities for third-party manufacturers, Microsoft doesn’t want to do anything that’s going to hasten the revolt before it’s able to wrap up version 7 (or at the very least, 6.5) — and competing with your own licensees would be a bang-up way to do that. Granted, Microsoft did exactly that by introducing Zune following the PlaysForSure initiative, but let’s be honest: Windows Mobile and Zune don’t play in the same league. Zune’s a hobby, a side gig; WinMo’s a monster, a long-term cash cow that’s got to be treated with the same franchise tag as Windows itself.

Second off, Microsoft now has Danger to keep it busy — and Danger’s core competencies have a long way to go to stretch Tegra to its limits, so we don’t think we’ll be seeing any superphones out of those guys any time soon. The more likely scenario is that Microsoft will use its Danger acquisition to step up its consumer-friendly mobile media game, which jibes with talk of a Zune-like smartphone codenamed “Pink” that could be announced early next year sans Tegra. With Windows Mobile looking still looking every bit as stuffy as it did five years ago, the company’s flagship mobile platform is still at least one or two major generations out from morphing into a catch-all that can look equally at ease in the schoolbag or the enterprise — a coup RIM has managed to pull off, coincidentally — and in the meantime, Hiptop is arguably a better starting point with more street cred under its belt, especially considering that Hiptop and Zune are both closed platforms.

So let’s run with the assumptions that: a) Pink does exist, and b) it’s basically Danger’s baby. That game plan prevents Microsoft from rocking the WinMo licensee boat (or yacht, as the case may be) — and every indication is that traditional players are still going full-steam ahead with Windows Mobile 6.5, a platform that actually stands a fighting chance of putting Tegra through its paces (one need look no further than TouchFLO 3D for evidence of that). How does this play out, then? The same as always, we’d wager — Microsoft graciously takes the stage with hardware partners at MWC next year, co-announcing a handful of Tegra-powered phones underpinned by the next generation of Windows Mobile. Now get back to Windows 7, Xbox 720, and making decent mice, Microsoft. And let Danger do its thing, alright?

Motorola’s Hint QA30 gets official

Motorola's Hint QA30 gets official

We weren’t particularly impressed when we got our first peek at MOTO’s QWERTY-sliding Hint QA30 yesterday morning, finding the form factor to be a little too squat for our tastes whether open or closed. Today the phone has been given the official treatment and, while things look a little better in a new set of glamor shots from Motorola (no more Alltel branding on the UI), the “innovative” design still doesn’t look particularly comfortable to carry or to use. Now that we can make out the buttons on the front we see that they’ll serve as controls for the media player when closed, again making us think this should be a good choice for your family’s texting-addict rocker. The specs we got before are confirmed, the one exception being that the microSD support tops out at 8GB, not 32GB — better turn down that bitrate, son.

Motorola's Hint QA30 gets official

    Samsung settles up with InterDigital in long-running patent infringement case

    At last, it’s over. InterDigital, which is best known for its episodes in the courtroom with Samsung and Nokia, has finally reached an agreement with the former firm. The two have been at each other’s throats since April of last year regarding patents allegedly used in some of Sammy’s more sophisticated phones. The decision was reached just a day before the US International Trade Commission was set to rule on whether to recommend barring affected Samsung imports altogether, which we can assure you was not at all coincidental. There’s been no public disclosure of settlement value, though one analyst at Hilliard Lyons estimates that Samsung will be coughing up $400 to $500 million over the next five years to make this problem go away. Talk about a recurring nightmare.

    Verizon announces Samsung Omnia for $249.99

    If it’s a 5-megapixel cameraphone you’re looking for, there are decidedly cheaper entries on the market — but if only a 5-megapixel WinMo Professional set will do, the Omnia’s just about the best (read: only) deal you’ll find on an American carrier these days. The CDMA translation of the smartphone that Samsung’s been selling in other parts of the world for much of 2008 in GSM form carries over most of its key features, namely Windows Mobile 6.1 with TouchWiz, WiFi, DivX certification, the love-it-or-hate-it optical directional pad, and that beefy cam with flash and autofocus. It also nabs VZ Navigator support, stereo Bluetooth, a 3.2-inch 400 x 240 display, and 8GB of internal memory. Gives pause to that imminent Touch Pro purchase, doesn’t it? Look for it to be available for order this week — a full retail launch is expected come December 8 — for $249.99 after rebate on a two-year contract.

    Read

      The toughest phone in the world just got tougher

       The toughest phone in the world just got tougher

      Sonim’s XP1 phone is already unquestionably the world’s toughest, so the imminent release of the even tougher XP3 is more than noteworthy, particularly for those of us who spend a lot of time near, on or in the water. The XP3 can withstand more shocks and drops than its predecessor, it’s buttons have been tested to function beyond 500,000 pushes, and boasts a Military Spec rating of 810F against salt, fog humidity, transport and thermal shock. It is capable of working at -20C or at +60C, which is way better than the human body, and comes with a three year, no-questions-asked guarantee. Most significantly though, it can be fully submersed in up to a meter of water for 30 minutes. All this means you can call your pet goldfish.

       The toughest phone in the world just got tougher

      Bob Plaschke, CEO of Sonim Technologies comments, “When we launched the Sonim XP1 last year, it was with a clear goal in mind. We wanted to create phones for people who work and play in rugged environments.” Plaschke continues: “For these people, having a phone is a tool, not a fashion accessory. They need a mobile handset to withstand some of nature’s harshest conditions. The Sonim XP3 is capable of working at -20C or at +60C without breaking down. We are committed to the rugged consumer, and the XP3 further proves our dedication to this community.”

      Since the XP3 is purposed to be a communications tool for use in rugged environments, it is equipped with a powerful 1180 mAh battery that delivers 5.5 hours of talk and over 9 days of standby time. As continued proof of Sonim’s confidence in its products, the XP3 comes with an unconditional, three-year warranty.

      “It’s true, it doesn’t matter how you break it, or whether you get it wet during the course of your work, we at Sonim Technologies will provide you with a replacement, no questions asked,” says Plaschke. “In fact, we challenge the industry to match our warranty.”

      “Our customers needs have been largely forgotten by the mobile industry. We have listened to the feedback from our core audience, such as plumbers, builders, and even first response and rescue teams throughout the world. The Sonim XP3 is our reminder to our customers that no matter how rugged and tough their environment, we can provide the phone that will withstand the stress.”

      The Sonim XP3 will be available prior to Christmas and in the UK will be available either SIM-unlocked for UKP245 or free on contract with Vodafone.

      wrsurveys

      Sony Ericsson Xperia X1 Video Preview


      For those who’ve been waiting to see what’s inside the Sony Ericsson Xperia X1 box, look no further than this video preview. Just to recap, this Smartphone features a “528HMz processor with 256MB of RAM and 512MB of ROM with a hardware 3D graphics accelerator.” Video after the break. Click here for first picture in gallery.

      The X1 is a quad-band GSM device with market-specific 3G, Wi-Fi and GPS. Despite the full QWERTY and larger display, the device is only slightly larger than HTC’s Touch Diamond. It’s metal casing adds to the hefty but solid feel, and the keyboard slide mechanism feels fantastic.